Category Archives: Subject areas

Sacra Doctrina Project

John Brungardt informs us of a promising new initiative that ‘aims to contribute to the Church’s longstanding tradition of seeking a knowledge through causes that is certain and evident about the source of our salvation that is still, at its height, … Continue reading

Quote | Posted on by | Leave a comment

Discussing Elijah

I had a wonderful discussion of Elijah’s journey to Mt. Carmel (1 Kings 19) with St. Augustine Academy students. You never know where discussions will lead, and what students will come up with, if you can get students to talk, … Continue reading

Posted in Living It, Reflections on the Books, Theology | 1 Comment

Towards Reforming High School Math and Science

…If I had to design a mechanism for the express purpose of destroying a child’s natural curiosity and love of pattern-making, I couldn’t possibly do as good a job as is currently being done— I simply wouldn’t have the imagination … Continue reading

Posted in Math and Science, Quadrivium, Secondary Education | 1 Comment

Turning the Whole Soul: The Moral Journey of the Philosophic Nature in Plato’s Republic

I forgot that we were playing and spoke rather intensely. For, as I was talking I looked at Philosophy and, seeing her undeservingly spattered with mud, I seem to have been vexed and said what I had to say too … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy, Reflections on the Books | 1 Comment

Oliver Sacks — Imitation is source of originality

Impressive people report how much insight they have found in the works of neurologist Oliver Sacks, as in this article on BrainPickings.org: Sontag’s experience, Sacks argues, reflects the common pattern in the natural cycle of creative evolution — we learn … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Education, Living It, Science, Trivium | Leave a comment

Basing Thought on Common Sense

A good, clear explanation of the meaning of common sense, one which stands up to scientific reductions and provides the foundation for bringing science into the service of wisdom. But perhaps someone playing devil’s advocate would preempt us and say: … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy, Science, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Is Morality Determined by Culture?

Many consider “cultural relativism” a new phenomenon. But people have long recognized that cultures differ in their moral beliefs and practices. It was not a modern anthropologist, but the Greek historian Herodotus who observed, “if one were to offer men to … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy, Relativism, Theology | 1 Comment

Moral Judgments – Facts or Opinions?

Allan Bloom began his Closing of the American Mind with this memorable observation: “There is one thing a professor can be absolutely certain of: almost every student entering the university believes, or says he believes, that truth is relative.” (25) College … Continue reading

Posted in For Teachers, Secondary Education, Theology | 1 Comment

Macbeth’s Porter

I love directing Shakespeare’s plays. Since the words mean everything in a successful performance, I am always faced with the challenge of interpreting every speech, every difficult passage, every seemingly insignificant scene. I delight in discovering the dramatic impact of … Continue reading

Posted in Literature, Reflections on the Books, Shakespeare | Leave a comment

Are there answers for human life apart from science?

There are always students at the beginning of my Moral Theology course who wonder why the class matters. To them, “moral theology” is perhaps a pretentious way of getting immersed in a set of rules dictated by the Church. For … Continue reading

Posted in Science, Theology | 1 Comment