Category Archives: Secondary Education

The Role of the Philosopher in Society a la Socrates

Below is a transcription of the Q&A session following my talk on the education of the philosopher in the Republic (Turning the Whole Soul). Most of the questions centered on the role the philosopher is supposed to play in society. … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy, Post-Secondary Education, Reflections on the Books, Secondary Education | Leave a comment

Integrating the Arts and Sciences through Natural Philosophy

In A Natural Philosopher’s Lament, John Brungardt addresses the important role natural philosophy should play in properly integrating studies of science and the humanities: In the natural sciences, love and skill can be at odds. Curricula that overemphasize technical competence … Continue reading

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Towards Reforming High School Math and Science

…If I had to design a mechanism for the express purpose of destroying a child’s natural curiosity and love of pattern-making, I couldn’t possibly do as good a job as is currently being done— I simply wouldn’t have the imagination … Continue reading

Posted in Math and Science, Quadrivium, Secondary Education | 1 Comment

Moral Judgments – Facts or Opinions?

Allan Bloom began his Closing of the American Mind with this memorable observation: “There is one thing a professor can be absolutely certain of: almost every student entering the university believes, or says he believes, that truth is relative.” (25) College … Continue reading

Posted in For Teachers, Secondary Education, Theology | 1 Comment

Figurative Language and the Poetic Art

Many years ago, I was doing research in the Catholic University of America library, and by chance discovered Shakespeare’s Use of the Arts of Language by Sister Miriam Joseph. At first, I was overwhelmed by the breadth and depth of … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Education, Languages, Literature, Secondary Education, Shakespeare, Subject areas, Trivium, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Classical education — “learning to read.”

In his Confessions, Augustine expresses gratitude for his classical education. Although he is highly critical of the pagan mythology that saturated his curriculum, he observes, “those primary lessons were better, assuredly, because more certain; seeing that by their agency I … Continue reading

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Jacques Barzun on Reading the “Classics”

Many readers will be familiar with Jacques Barzun from his monumental From Dawn to Decadence: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life, which he completed at age 93. (Barzun died in 2012 at the ripe old age of 104!) Among his … Continue reading

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Using discussions of Scripture to supplement Moral Theology

Since my first child entered high school, I have volunteered at St. Augustine Academy to help teach Moral Theology.  The first year, I simply used the Didache’s textbook, Our Moral Life in Christ, but found it unsuitable at provoking and … Continue reading

Posted in Secondary Education, Theology | 1 Comment

Stories in Don Quixote

“Idle Reader” is the way Cervantes chooses to address his audience at the beginning of the Prologue to Don Quixote, and it points to one of the background social problems of the work.  In the early seventeenth century Spain of … Continue reading

Posted in Literature, Post-Secondary Education, Secondary Education, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Mathematics in Classical Education

Thomas Treloar of Hillsdale College gives a very helpful overview of the role of mathematics historically and in classical education.  I think more should be said about the difference in character between algebraically-based modern mathematics, which trains us to reason … Continue reading

Posted in Classical Education, Math and Science, Quadrivium, Secondary Education | Tagged , | 1 Comment