Category Archives: Reflections on the Books

Macbeth’s Porter

I love directing Shakespeare’s plays. Since the words mean everything in a successful performance, I am always faced with the challenge of interpreting every speech, every difficult passage, every seemingly insignificant scene. I delight in discovering the dramatic impact of … Continue reading

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Stoic Lies and Assisted Suicide

Frequently, I find immediate connections between readings and discussions of great authors and contemporary issues. In our last CIT webinar discussion, we considered St. Augustine’s analysis of all the views held by philosophers about happiness. St. Augustine points to one … Continue reading

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Telemachos and the Divine

The Odyssey is an epic that often reads like a contemporary novel.  It opens with an intimate portrayal of a terrible but familiar situation — a young man has grown up without a father, and is overwhelmed by responsibilities that … Continue reading

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Chastity seen through the Greeks

I have meditated often over the past years on what chastity is really like.  In our sex-obsessed times, our image of chastity can hardly help but be distorted.  Yet forming a proper image of the person we want to become … Continue reading

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Catholic gratitude for CS Lewis

The 50th anniversary of the death of CS Lewis is a fitting opportunity to recollect what Lewis has meant to many, many Catholics.  Aleteia invited a number of its board of experts to comment on this. I think that Lewis … Continue reading

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